Tell Me Again…

What happened to the 1st Amendment?

Obama signs executive order to allow shut down of all US communications – West Palm Beach News | Examiner.comObama signs executive order to allow shut down of all US communications
July 8th, 2013 by Marilyn Daly
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Credit: Photo by Ron Sachs-Pool/Getty
WASHINGTON, DC – JULY 7: (AFP OUT) U.S. President Barack Obama aboard Marine One arrives on the South Lawn of the White House July 7, 2013 in Washington, D.C. Obama spent the holiday weekend at Camp David
RT has reported that in a secretly unannounced move, President Barack Obama signed an executive order giving the Department of Homeland Security the ability to shut down all of the United States’ communications systems upon his request. Barack Obama laid out a statement he titled “Assignment of National Security Emergency Preparedness Communications Function”. No doubt a very confusing title. The reasoning behind his issuing of this executive order, is that he feels the government may one day need to access all of our telephones, computers, cable communications, etc., in the name of national security.

“The Federal Government must have the ability to communicate at all times and under all circumstances to carry out its most critical and time sensitive mission.”

The American public should be concerned about what this “mission” could be. In a presidential election, one candidate’s mission may not be the same as his opponents. RT quotes the president as saying:

“Such communications must be possible under all circumstances to ensure national security, effectively manage emergencies and improve national security..”

The fact that our nation needs so much “national security” is puzzling, given the fact that President Obama has declared himself leader of the front that has ended terrorism in the U.S. It seems like now, more than ever, our nation is in peril according to the State Department; but many U.S. citizens are asking themselves, “From what?”, or better yet, “From who?”

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Freedom of speech
For the freedom of speech in specific jurisdictions, see Freedom of speech by country.
“Freedom of expression” redirects here. For other uses, see Freedom of expression (disambiguation).
For other uses, see Freedom of speech (disambiguation).
Freedom of speech is the political right to communicate one’s opinions and ideas using one’s body and property to anyone who is willing to receive them. The term freedom of expression is sometimes used synonymously, but includes any act of seeking, receiving and imparting information or ideas, regardless of the medium used. In practice, the right to freedom of speech is not absolute in any country and the right is commonly subject to limitations, as with libel, slander, obscenity, sedition (including, for example inciting ethnic hatred), copyright violation, revelation of information that is classified or otherwise.

The right to freedom of expression is recognized as a human right under Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and recognized in international human rights law in the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR). Article 19 of the ICCPR states that “[e]veryone shall have the right to hold opinions without interference” and “everyone shall have the right to freedom of expression; this right shall include freedom to seek, receive and impart information and ideas of all kinds, regardless of frontiers, either orally, in writing or in print, in the form of art, or through any other media of his choice”. Article 19 goes on to say that the exercise of these rights carries “special duties and responsibilities” and may “therefore be subject to certain restrictions” when necessary “[f]or respect of the rights or reputation of others” or “[f]or the protection of national security or of public order (order public), or of public health or morals”.[1][2]

Freedom of speech may be legally curtailed in some religious legal systems and in secular jurisdictions where it is found to cause religious offense, such as the British Racial and Religious Hatred Act 2006.

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